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8th grade social studies

Eighth Grade U.S. History Curriculum—Course Outline

Mrs. Helmer and Mrs. Martin

United States History:  Constitutional Age to International Expansion

The eighth grade course of study begins with a review of the major ideas, issues, and events of the founding of the nation and Constitutional Period. Students will then concentrate on the critical events, people, groups, ideas, and issues of the period from 1800 to 1900 - including Westward expansion, sectionalism, the Civil War, Reconstruction, Populism, and Imperialism. The course is rigorous and relevant with instruction that integrates thinking skills, historical processes, and content so students are able to apply the learning to their own lives. Instruction includes the integration of concepts and principles from history, economics, geography, civics, and the humanities.   An emphasis will be placed on the “doing” of history rather than simple acquisition of content knowledge.

  1. Establishing America (1787—1830s)
  2. Regionalism and Expansion (1800s—1850s)
  3. March to War (1850s—1861)
  4. Toward a More Perfect Union (1861—1877)
  5. The Rise of America (1870s—1900)

Major Units of Study:

Veteran’s Unit:   In this unit students will have the opportunity to interview a veteran from any American war.  They will create questions for the interview and prepare a media presentation. 

 

Historical Readings:    Five A.R. points (or the equivalent) will be required each semester.  The book may be historical fiction or historical nonfiction.  The book must be read by the student outside of class.   If a student would like to read a book that does not have an A.R. test available, he or she will need to see me about written or oral book reports.  We will be reading the novels My Brother Sam is Dead and Walks in the Sun aloud in class during 1st and 4th quarters. 

 

Presidential Unit:   Students will research the lives and times of the Presidents.  Their research will be used as both a review and a preview of things to come in their study of American History.  We will spend time each week learning about these influential men. 

 

Supreme Court Landmark Cases:   Students will have the opportunity to research events and people surrounding landmark Supreme Court Cases. 

 

The Stock Market Game:    In teams of 3-5 students, students will compete in a national competition by investing a hypothetical $100,000 in stocks over a 10-week period.  Students will also participate in the InvestWrite Essay Contest.

 

 

Classroom Standard Operating Procedures:

Grading Policy:   All grading will be done on a total-point basis using the traditional scale.

 

Late Work:   One of the most important goals of education is to teach responsibility.  I will happily grade any assignment for full credit when it is turned in on the due date.   Late work is not acceptable.   Major assignments will receive a 10 percent deduction for each day it is late.   Daily work must be completed on the due date. 

 

Textbook:    Holt McDougal’s United States History 2012

 There will be access to the texbook online.

Eighth Grade U.S. History Curriculum—Course Outline

Mrs. Helmer and Mrs. Martin

United States History:  Constitutional Age to International Expansion

The eighth grade course of study begins with a review of the major ideas, issues, and events of the founding of the nation and Constitutional Period. Students will then concentrate on the critical events, people, groups, ideas, and issues of the period from 1800 to 1900 - including Westward expansion, sectionalism, the Civil War, Reconstruction, Populism, and Imperialism. The course is rigorous and relevant with instruction that integrates thinking skills, historical processes, and content so students are able to apply the learning to their own lives. Instruction includes the integration of concepts and principles from history, economics, geography, civics, and the humanities.   An emphasis will be placed on the “doing” of history rather than simple acquisition of content knowledge.

  1. Establishing America (1787—1830s)
  2. Regionalism and Expansion (1800s—1850s)
  3. March to War (1850s—1861)
  4. Toward a More Perfect Union (1861—1877)
  5. The Rise of America (1870s—1900)

Major Units of Study:

Veteran’s Unit:   In this unit students will have the opportunity to interview a veteran from any American war.  They will create questions for the interview and prepare a media presentation. 

 

Historical Readings:    Five A.R. points (or the equivalent) will be required each semester.  The book may be historical fiction or historical nonfiction.  The book must be read by the student outside of class.   If a student would like to read a book that does not have an A.R. test available, he or she will need to see me about written or oral book reports.  We will be reading the novels My Brother Sam is Dead and Walks in the Sun aloud in class during 1st and 4th quarters. 

 

Presidential Unit:   Students will research the lives and times of the Presidents.  Their research will be used as both a review and a preview of things to come in their study of American History.  We will spend time each week learning about these influential men. 

 

Supreme Court Landmark Cases:   Students will have the opportunity to research events and people surrounding landmark Supreme Court Cases. 

 

The Stock Market Game:    In teams of 3-5 students, students will compete in a national competition by investing a hypothetical $100,000 in stocks over a 10-week period.  Students will also participate in the InvestWrite Essay Contest.

 

 

Classroom Standard Operating Procedures:

Grading Policy:   All grading will be done on a total-point basis using the traditional scale.

 

Late Work:   One of the most important goals of education is to teach responsibility.  I will happily grade any assignment for full credit when it is turned in on the due date.   Late work is not acceptable.   Major assignments will receive a 10 percent deduction for each day it is late.   Daily work must be completed on the due date. 

 

Textbook:    Holt McDougal’s United States History 2012

 There will be access to the texbook online.